Story Archaeology

Uncovering the layers of Irish Mythology through a regular podcast and related articles.

Tag Archives: Early Irish Language

Dindshenchas 11: Tocmarc Étaíne 3 – A Game of Fidchell

As we reach the final section of “The Wooing of Étaín”, a game of fidchell leads to some epic gains and losses.  There will be archaic poetry, incest, a War of the Worlds and some civil engineering. Join the Story Archaeologists as they encounter a tale where text and archaeology come together in an extraordinary …

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Dindshenchas 01: From Vellum to Hardback – An Interview with Dr. Ranke de Vries (Part 2)

Begin Series 3, Dindshenchas and the Art of Mythic Cartography, as the Story Archaeologists interview Dr. Ranke de Vries, editor of “Two Texts on Loch nEchach”. With Chris away in Australia, Isolde, left behind in chilly Ireland, had the pleasure of interviewing friend and former teacher, Ranke de Vries, after the recent launch of her …

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Dindshenchas 01: From Vellum to Hardback – An Interview with Dr. Ranke de Vries (Part 1)

Begin Series 3, Dindshenchas and the Art of Mythic Cartography, as the Story Archaeologists interview Dr. Ranke de Vries, editor of “Two Texts on Loch nEchach”. With Chris away in Australia, Isolde, left behind in chilly Ireland, had the pleasure of interviewing friend and former teacher, Ranke de Vries, after the recent launch of her …

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References for Episode 12

In the episode, we referred to a passage in the introduction to Elizabeth Gray’s Irish Texts Society edition of Cath Maige Tuired [page 19 of the print edition].  If you have been reading the text on CELT, it doesn’t include the introduction. So below is a list of the sections she cites containing the Old Irish …

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A Jigsaw of Naming

In the podcast episode “The Morrigan’s view”, we were discussing the aftermath of the Battle of Moytura and the way Lóch, Imdech’s poet, is given, it seems, the honour of naming aspects of the  Dé Danann forces, especially the charioteers, their chariots, horses, and goads. To an extent, these lists are poetic, alliterative groupings, but …

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The Declaration of Peace

This is the poem spoken by Lóch Lethglas, the poet of Indéch Mac Dé Domnann, and is the third “request” he grants to Lug in return for peace.  It serves as a peace-treaty or declaration from the Fomoire.  There are certain similarities between this poem and the Mór Rígain’s vision of peace (see Poems of …

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The Banishment of Balor

It is then that Lug said: I may look small next to you, but I am the one who will choose the day of your death. And Balor replied: Now I see that in the germ of the seed that I planted lies the form of my own destruction. Lug replied: It is so, for …

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The Forge and the Well

from Cath Maige Tuired, Sections 122-3, Lines 526 – 543 Edition: Elizabeth Gray Translation: Isolde Carmody To accompany our discussion of the Four Craftsmen, here are the sections of the text describing the beautifully choreographed work in the forge.  I’ve also included the following section describing the family of physicians working around the well of …

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Names of the Dagda

from Cath Maige Tuired, edited by Elizabeth Gray translation by Isolde Carmody   When the Dagda encounters Indech’s daughter, she demands that he carry her on his back.  He replies that it is geis (“taboo”) for him to carry anyone on his back who does not call him by name.  She asks his name, and …

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Lug and Balor Meet

from Cath Maige Tuired, edited by Elizabeth Gray Translation by Isolde Carmody Here is the next piece of roscad poetry attributed to Lug in our text.  It is the traditional climax of the battle, where Lug finally confronts his grandfather, Balor, which had been prophesied as the moment of Balor’s death. This section has not …

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